Welcome

If you are new to family history, you might be asking “where do I start?”  Family History research starts with yourself and works backwards through your parent’s line, then your grandparent’s line – this is working from the known to the unknown.

You might say “well why would I do that because I certainly know all about myself and my parents and lots of information about my grandparents”.  Knowing the family story is sometimes different to what is recorded in the actual records. If you do not work back through your generations it is very easy to miss vital clues. The only way to make sure you have the right information is a methodical search back through the generations.

This is where you start to either use charts to record your information, or use a genealogy computer program developed specifically for family history.

Recording what you know about your family members will help you to decide the next step in your search, eg full names, dates of birth where they were born, marriage when and where it took place and death and burial information or you might also know other information, like occupation, where the family lived, how many children, you start to get an overall picture of your family because the information is recorded in one place, and what you don’t know you can search various indexes.

Taking this approach you can see where the gaps are, where you can focus your research to find more information.  So how do you do this? Using resources in our Library will help you to expand your tree.  Listed below are some examples of the type of records that could be used to develop your family tree information.

Examples of records:

BDM records

Electoral Rolls

Census returns

Church Records

Cemetery Register

Cemetery Inspections

Pioneer Lists

Convicts

Shipping

Land records

School records

Books about families

Post Office Directories

Armed forces records

Obituary notices

Crews Lists

Immigration

Rate Books

Cattle Brands

Government Gazettes

Police Gazettes

These records may be held in databases online, CD, microfiche, microfilm or in hard copy (in books or just some index).

With the exception of our exchange journals with other societies, all our resources are for reference only and cannot be borrowed.

Please ask one of our voluntary Librarians should you become “stuck” on your tree or you need more information about what resources to use, or how to use them.

We hope that you find family history as fascinating as we do.